Effective Street Evangelism with Changed Lives? Yes! Right here!

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Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.  James 1:27

I think this is true street evangelism right here.  It is being done on a busy street, but there are no mega phones, no one is shouting at people walking by telling them they are on their way to hell.  This street evangelism is quiet, yet it is changing lives, not only for mothers and their babies, but for those involved in this work.  Please watch this short documentary trailer.

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Korean Pastor Lee Jong-rak saw a need in his city.  He saw so many orphaned babies, he did something about it by creating a “drop box” for babies – a box built outside of his home equipped with blanket, a heat source, and even a bell to ring notifying Jong-rak or staff that a baby was placed inside.  Desperate mothers who might have abandoned their babies in unsafe places now had a safe place to leave them – – a place where they would be clothed, fed, and loved.

Pastor Lee Jong-rak seems to have it right, biblically. We in our “churchianity” seem to make such a big deal about having the perfect doctrine.  Many try to figure out if someone got “saved” the “right” way.   I’m so fed up with this craziness going on in our churches.  This compassionate pastor in South Korea is doing street evangelism the right way, in my opinion. He’s caring for the defenseless, precious orphaned babies, helping those in need and without voice. He’s actually being the hands and feet of Christ.  Is there any more powerful message than this kind of love – the kind of love that strikes deep into hearts and changes lives?

Imagine what a mother must feel when she drops her baby off at the Drop Box?  One mother left this note (translated into English):

“My baby! Mom is so sorry.
I am so sorry to make this decision.
My son! I hope you to meet great parents, and I am very, very sorry .
I don’t deserve to say a word.
Sorry, sorry, and I love you my son.
Mom loves you more than anything else.
I leave you here because I don’t know who your father is.
I used to think about something bad, but I guess this box is safer for you.
That’s why I decided to leave you here. My son, Please forgive me.”

What message of Christ is she being presented when she knows that her baby is safe and taken care of?  It may not come quickly for her, but you can be sure that there will be promptings on her heart: what kind of person is willing to sacrifice their time and resources to take care of my baby, a complete stranger?  Who has that kind of love and where does it come from?

Brian Ivie’s life was changed by this kind of street evangelism:

Ivie was stirred to do the film after reading an article in the LA Times about Pastor Jong-rak’s mission, and he decided to go to Korea to make the documentary. After seeing the testimonies of this orphanage up close, Brian Ivie’s life was changed. In his acceptance speech, Ivie said, “These kids are not mistakes. They are important.” He went on saying, “I became a Christian while making this movie. When I started to make it and I saw all these kids come through the drop box – it was like a flash from heaven, just like these kids with disabilities had crooked bodies, I have a crooked soul. And God loves me still. When it comes to this sanctity of life issue, we must realize that that faith in God is the only refuge for people who are deemed unnecessary. This world is so much about self-reliance, self-worth, and self-esteem. It’s a total illusion that we can be self-sufficient. Christ is the only thing that enables us.”  (Source)

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10 comments on “Effective Street Evangelism with Changed Lives? Yes! Right here!

  1. Korean Pastor Lee Jong-rak saw a need in his city. He saw so many orphaned babies, he did something about it by creating a “drop box” for babies – a box built outside of his home equipped with blanket, a heat source, and even a bell to ring notifying Jong-rak or staff that a baby was placed inside. Desperate mothers who might have abandoned their babies in unsafe places now had a safe place to leave them – – a place where they would be clothed, fed, and loved.

    I remember hearing about this being done before — that in the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment Era, several churches, monasteries, and convents had similar drop boxes for abandoned children.

    Pastor Lee Jong-rak seems to have it right, biblically. We in our “churchianity” seem to make such a big deal about having the perfect doctrine.

    Just like the Communists made such a big deal about having the Perfect Purity of Ideology.

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  2. P.S. How does the “baby box” differ from those 1st through 3rd-century Christians in the Roman Empire who would go out to places where the surrounding culture left unwanted/defective babies to die (“Exposed” was the term back then), recover them and adopt them?

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  3. what a beautiful life, grateful for Ivie’s salvation and the love this dear pastor extends daily to love in action and truth…didn’t hear any yelling from him~just a sweet gentle calm of passing God’s love onto others. No judgement against mothers who cannot or will not raise their children…amazing love

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  4. Trust me. There is a lot of craziness in Korean churches too :). What a beautiful story.

    The story reminds me of this NPR story. The American couple from Wisconsin initially went to China as underground missionaries to connect with people and to share the gospel. But he went onto open an orphanage and also went “aboveground” with the gospel. You can hear from the audio version, a group of people bellow out “Amazing Grace” out in the open. Nobody from the Chinese authorities bats an eye.

    When asked how he pulls it off, he quotes St. Francis of Assisi

    “Preach the Gospel every day, and if necessary, use words.”

    Then he continues He continues, “I want people to see my faith, not hear about it so much.” Then he follows up with a Chinese proverb:

    “Seeing something once beats hearing about it a hundred times.”

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  5. Trust me. There is a lot of craziness in Korean churches too 🙂

    Of which the craziest was the “Ugo” Rapture Scare in the Eighties. Not only did those taken in by it sell everything for Evangelism, women had abortions so the fetus wouldn’t weigh them down and prevent them ascending into Heaven. After the THIS IS IT date came and went, I think the preacher who started it almost got lynched.

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  6. Tragically, the number of unwanted babies has gone down in many developed countries. Many are aborted before they are born, instead. To paraphrase what Meagan said so well, “this pastor has God’s amazing love within and extended it to mothers who cannot or will not raise their children.” His actions highlight the hypocrisy of many pastors today. If more pastors loved practically (like there’s another kind of love), maybe the alternative to abortion would look less like a scarlet letter for their congregants. Churches would actually become sanctuaries for both believers, and non-believers! This pastor is a top down example for the sheep to follow in loving these babies. I heard him say he would die for them. I did not hear him say he would track the mothers down, make them members, and then church discipline them. Revolutionary! 🙂

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  7. Sometimes, mere goodness can leave people speechless – like now. This is a testimony of people loving in the name of Jesus. A part of me want to compare it against the callousness of a comment left on my blog recently, but I won’t even mention that.

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  8. This pastor is a top down example for the sheep to follow in loving these babies. I heard him say he would die for them. I did not hear him say he would track the mothers down, make them members, and then church discipline them. Revolutionary!

    More like reviving a very old Christian practice. Like the 1st through 3rd-Century Christians who would recover babies left “Exposed” (i.e. left to die as defective or unwanted), adopt, and raise them. And the Medieval churches who had their own version of the “baby box” for abandoned children.

    All of which somehow fell by the wayside during the Doctrine/Ideology fights of the Reformation Wars and only sporadically recovered. To the point the Baby Box sounds like something new and strange.

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  9. HUG said: “To the point the Baby Box sounds like something new and strange.”

    It’s absolutely strange today. I don’t know of a pastor that concerned about unwanted babies to the point it’s an actionable item. “Social issues” are non-essentials. Doctrine is essential. It’s alarming and unfortunate. Especially when the doctrine (total depravity of the Saints, we can do nothing to please God, etc.) is wrong and the results speak for themselves.

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