ABUSE & VIOLENCE IN THE CHURCH, Classical Conversations, No-Talk Rule, Spiritual Bullies

Classical Conversations #9: Bullying as Peer Pressure, and Could CC Compromise Homeschooling Laws in Canada?


NOTE: This is part of a series that began with these earlier posts:

Note from Julie Anne:  “IngonitoToes” shares her experience and concerns when her family participated in her local Canadian Classical Conversations group. She brings up some important issues:

  • Bullying
  • Pride and arrogance among students and parents
  • Memorizing information without an understanding of the material
  • Implications of the CC program on Canadian homeschool laws
  • Anarchy from Corporate
  • No asking questions

Update 1/18/2019: I have had feedback from people that this post does not have the same tone other posts in this series have had. This was originally a comment that came in on an older post that I made into a post on its own. I did so because I thought it was of the recurring themes that I mentioned in the bullet points above, but also because of the possible implications in Canadian homeschool laws.

There is a local homeschool group in my town that is functioning fine. They have good leaders, and if they read this series, they might be surprised to learn of the difficulties and spiritual abuse others have experienced.

Spiritual Sounding Board’s purpose is to be a safe place for those to share their experiences. I do this because many times there is not a place where they can do so in their location. It is important to note that if IngognitoToes shared her story on the Classical Conversations Facebook group, it would be removed immediately. That should tell you something about the Classical Conversations culture. A healthy organization is not afraid of pushback. They are grateful for it because it gives them an opportunity to improve. ~ja


Photo by Pragyan Bezbaruah on Pexels.com


IngognitoToes Shares Her Story

We are from Canada and we tried the Classical Conversations group in our city, but found it very cliquey and hugely disappointing. There seemed to be an arrogant ignorance among the clique of mothers, and if you wanted to be truly accepted in the group, you had to blindly conform and follow with no questions asked.

Asking questions was offensive. This arrogance trickled on down to the children, who some could neither read nor write at the age of nine (to each their own), but they seemed to be very prideful that they could recite words that they had no true understanding of.

My kids who are literate were made fun of for not memorizing everything by the illiterate children… The bullying was considered positive peer pressure to conform to the group & was very much condoned by the mothers & the director.

I agree that Classical Conversations is likely a cult, but with a twist of anarchy. The academic standards were lower than the standards of our public schools in Canada. In fact I would not be surprised that this is the group that will likely be the reason for homeschooling to eventually become illegal in Canada! They make the rest of the homeschool community look very backwards!

As for the corporate part of Classical Conversations, between the communications with the bookstore and the people responsible for training the tutors, it was quite obvious that the arrogant ignorance and anarchy comes right from the company themselves.

There is one BIG thing we did come away with from this experience. It was IEW; and Classical Conversations can NOT take credit for this writing program whatsoever! Other than that, we came away with nothing valuable, not even friendship, although we made huge one-sided efforts!

We “were unevenly yoked”… Haha… But I’m still dealing with the after effects of the backwardness of the bullying of the illiterates on the literates.

On a side note:
I am looking forward to reading through this entire blog because honestly, this experience was a great example of how abusive & backwards Christianity really can be.


9 thoughts on “Classical Conversations #9: Bullying as Peer Pressure, and Could CC Compromise Homeschooling Laws in Canada?”

  1. I am so sorry for you and your kids. That is heartbreaking to hear. We are first and foremost moms and educators before any loyalty to any program. I hope you are able to find a group of loving and supportive friends on this homeschool journey. I agree with you on the arrogance part of CC. It is ridiculous.

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  2. The only thing I take exception with is the “Christianity” part, how abusive and backwards it can be, because while some Christians do CC and it is at least nominally Christian, my experience with it is that it does not tend to instill legitimate Christian values.

    Our good friends who did the CC thing with their kids are Christians, but at least with their oldest, it did not seem to make him act like much of anything but an arrogant, privileged kid. Not even a poor performance on the ACTs was sufficient to shake his self-confidence. He’s in college now and, having gotten away from the CC influence, is maturing nicely, but he and his mother could be just insufferable while he was going through the CC thing.

    Arrogance and ignorance may go hand-in-hand, but they are sure not Christian virtues. They pretty much fly on the face of what Jesus taught. That’s why I don’t consider CC a legitimate representation of Christianity.

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  3. Please note the following update I added to the post:

    Update 1/18/2019:

    I have had feedback from people that this post does not have the same tone other posts in this series have had. This was originally a comment that came in on an older post that I made into a post on its own. I did so because I thought it was of the recurring themes that I mentioned in the bullet points above, but also because of the possible implications in Canadian homeschool laws.

    There is a local homeschool group in my town that is functioning fine. They have good leaders, and if they read this series, they might be surprised to learn of the difficulties and spiritual abuse others have experienced.

    Spiritual Sounding Board’s purpose is to be a safe place for those to share their experiences. I do this because many times there is not a place where they can do so in their location. It is important to note that if IngognitoToes shared her story on the Classical Conversations Facebook group, it would be removed immediately. That should tell you something about the Classical Conversations culture. A healthy organization is not afraid of pushback. They are grateful for it because it gives them an opportunity to improve. ~ja

    Like

  4. I really feel like though everyone should feel free to share their story, this is not helpful to the overall conversation and the exposure of corporate policies and issues. It just comes across as a vent and a bit disgruntled. I truly did not see a ton of support in the article for the billeted claims made.

    The degrading use of the word illiterates (and it is used to degrade) is very unkind and judgmental and it sets the tone for the piece. I know the writer talks about pride and arrogance, but that tone and continuously referring to young children as illiterates comes across extremely arrogant, prideful, and just mean. It discredits the piece.

    Also, it seems very much a stretch to say that CC is the reason that homeschooling may become illegal in Canada. There is absolutely no reason, support, or evidence provide for this bold statement.

    I am all about exposing the flaws in CC and exploring the corporate culture and some of the things that are happening that are scary. However, this addition to the series does more harm than good. Just one bad article can discredit an entire series as petty. I felt informed by the content of #1 – #8. I think this one should have stayed in the comments where it belonged. It feels more like a fluff piece full of opinions. It was not quite obvious to me.

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  5. I see that. I still feel even with the disclaimer it is not helpful to the series, does nothing to enlighten the reader about structure and policy flaws, and is more harmful than helpful.

    It makes me sad that this site which does a great job of highlighting spiritual abuse wrote (or promoted) a post with verbal abuse calling children illiterates. It really bothers me – those are children and condescendingly referring to them as illiterate is just wrong. No matter what the writer feels they did to deserve it.

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  6. Hey Torn – You’re not being particularly helpful yourself. The lady was frustrated, and she ranted about what she experienced. I can understand some of that frustration, having seen what CC and similar mindsets can do to kids with perfectly good minds–it can make fools of them.

    As for your concerns about Julie Anne allowing her rant to be posted, what about the rants God allowed to stand for the last two to three thousand years without modification? How about the one where David said “Let his children become waifs and beggars”(Psalm 109)? Or David speaking of how one who “dashed” the babies of Babylon “against rocks” would be blessed? (Psalm 137) Or when Paul said of the Pharisees that he wished they’d just castrate themselves? (Galations 5)

    Do you think the Lord really, honestly wished for Pharisees to butcher themselves or for the enemies of David to have their kids wandering the streets starving–and their babies thrown against rocks? Of course not! But unlike you, the Lord is willing to allow real human passion and frustration to stand–He gives grace to people and allows them to express their frustration in strong terms, He even inspires such things with the Holy Spirit.

    And while I can find many, many examples of God allowing things far stronger than what you condemned here to be part of our Bible, one thing I cannot find over the course of 66 books written over more than 1,000 years is a smug, sing-songy “It makes me sad…” finger-wagging such as you have produced. You’ll find absolutely nothing like that in the Bible–except from the Pharisees. THAT’s what should make you sad.

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  7. Torn, I do not think it is appropriate to accuse the commenter of being abusive. That has crossed the line. She clearly said in her comment that there were “some” 9 year olds who did not know how to read. She was referring to those “some.” If they can’t read, they are illiterate. She was saying that to prove the (important) point that CC forces children to memorize without knowing how to read. That is problematic.

    I am feeling pressure by you to remove this post. I don’t appreciate that. I am not removing it because she speaks for many. This woman represents many who have felt bullied. This mom represents many who see that forcing children to memorize without encouraging foundational academic requirements like reading to be amiss. Even if she was the only one who has encountered this treatment, her voice deserves to be heard. Please don’t silence people who have gotten the courage to speak out.

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  8. JA – The one doing the bullying right now is Torn. Torn is using a shaming technique, heavy on the sanctimony. It’s very typical behavior of one who’s in an abusive, only nominally Christian environment. I’ve seen it and experienced it. I’d give Torn no consideration whatsoever and let the lady’s rant stand. You’re in the right here, just one man’s opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

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