SSB Sunday Gathering

SSB Sunday Gathering – October 6, 2019

This is your place to gather and share in an open format.

Scripture is taken from the Book of Common Prayer, Readings for Ordinary Time, Year 1 and may be found here.

Psalm 145

A psalm of praise. Of David.

I will exalt you, my God the King; I will praise your name for ever and ever. Every day I will praise you and extol your name for ever and ever.

Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise; his greatness no one can fathom. One generation commends your works to another; they tell of your mighty acts. They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty — and I will meditate on your wonderful works. They tell of the power of your awesome works — and I will proclaim your great deeds. They celebrate your abundant goodness and joyfully sing of your righteousness.

The Lord is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and rich in love.

The Lord is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made. All your works praise you, Lord; your faithful people extol you. They tell of the glory of your kingdom and speak of your might, so that all people may know of your mighty acts and the glorious splendor of your kingdom. Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures through all generations.

The Lord is trustworthy in all he promises and faithful in all he does. The Lord upholds all who fall and lifts up all who are bowed down. The eyes of all look to you, and you give them their food at the proper time. You open your hand and satisfy the desires of every living thing.

The Lord is righteous in all his ways and faithful in all he does. The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth. He fulfills the desires of those who fear him; he hears their cry and saves them. The Lord watches over all who love him, but all the wicked he will destroy.

My mouth will speak in praise of the Lord. Let every creature praise his holy name for ever and ever.

Acts 12: 1 – 17

It was about this time that King Herod arrested some who belonged to the church, intending to persecute them. He had James, the brother of John, put to death with the sword. When he saw that this met with approval among the Jews, he proceeded to seize Peter also. This happened during the Festival of Unleavened Bread. After arresting him, he put him in prison, handing him over to be guarded by four squads of four soldiers each. Herod intended to bring him out for public trial after the Passover.

So Peter was kept in prison, but the church was earnestly praying to God for him.

The night before Herod was to bring him to trial, Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains, and sentries stood guard at the entrance. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him up. “Quick, get up!” he said, and the chains fell off Peter’s wrists.

Then the angel said to him, “Put on your clothes and sandals.” And Peter did so. “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me,” the angel told him. Peter followed him out of the prison, but he had no idea that what the angel was doing was really happening; he thought he was seeing a vision. They passed the first and second guards and came to the iron gate leading to the city. It opened for them by itself, and they went through it. When they had walked the length of one street, suddenly the angel left him.

Then Peter came to himself and said, “Now I know without a doubt that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from Herod’s clutches and from everything the Jewish people were hoping would happen.”

When this had dawned on him, he went to the house of Mary the mother of John, also called Mark, where many people had gathered and were praying. Peter knocked at the outer entrance, and a servant named Rhoda came to answer the door. When she recognized Peter’s voice, she was so overjoyed she ran back without opening it and exclaimed, “Peter is at the door!”

“You’re out of your mind,” they told her. When she kept insisting that it was so, they said, “It must be his angel.”

But Peter kept on knocking, and when they opened the door and saw him, they were astonished. Peter motioned with his hand for them to be quiet and described how the Lord had brought him out of prison. “Tell James and the other brothers and sisters about this,” he said, and then he left for another place.

Luke 7: 11 – 17

Soon afterward, Jesus went to a town called Nain, and his disciples and a large crowd went along with him. As he approached the town gate, a dead person was being carried out — the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. And a large crowd from the town was with her. When the Lord saw her, his heart went out to her and he said, “Don’t cry.”

Then he went up and touched the bier they were carrying him on, and the bearers stood still. He said, “Young man, I say to you, get up!” The dead man sat up and began to talk, and Jesus gave him back to his mother.

They were all filled with awe and praised God. “A great prophet has appeared among us,” they said. “God has come to help his people.” This news about Jesus spread throughout Judea and the surrounding country.

***

I had to share this today given her success and the impact of this song.

***

May the peace of the Lord Christ go with you: wherever he may send you;

may he guide you through the wilderness: protect you from the storm;

may he bring you home rejoicing: at the wonders he has shown you;

may he bring you home rejoicing: once again into our doors.

***

Feel free to join the discussion.

You can share your church struggles and concerns.

Let’s also use it as a time to encourage one another spiritually.

What have you found spiritually encouraging lately?

Do you have any special Bible verses to share, any YouTube songs that you have found uplifting?

5 thoughts on “SSB Sunday Gathering – October 6, 2019”

  1. Putting this post together was a reminder of how uncomfortable the Bible can be at times. Psalm 118 was the other verse listed in the Book of Common prayer for today. I started out with that one but was turned off by David’s words of killing his enemies in the name of the Lord.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for this worship space. A reminder today how very encouraging the bible is. Since I lost some income this week and wondered how I will find food and rent payments these words brought much needed peace.
    Psalms 124: The Lord upholds all who fall and lifts up all who are bowed down. The eyes of all look to you, and you give them their food at the proper time. You open your hand and satisfy the desires of every living thing.

    The Lord is righteous in all his ways and faithful in all he does. The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth. He fulfills the desires of those who fear him; he hears their cry and saves them.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I started out with that one but was turned off by David’s words of killing his enemies in the name of the Lord.

    We are doing a series on an OT scholar in sunday school right now and he has a very negative take on Solomon (and David) and it was so on point for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My current pastor had a very interesting take on the conquest of the promised land. He points to Genesis 15 where God says: “Then in the fourth generation they will return here, for the iniquity of the Amorite is not yet complete.”

    And Isaiah 1 where God says: “Wash yourselves, make yourselves clean;
    Remove the evil of your deeds from My sight.
    Cease to do evil,
    Learn to do good;
    Seek justice,
    Reprove the ruthless,
    Defend the orphan,
    Plead for the widow.”

    His thought was that instead of the common theme that the Israelites went around killing all these people for their idolatry, instead, it was a matter of social justice. These nations sacrificed their children and they mistreated the poor and powerless.

    There are some interesting subnarratives – for example, Joshua makes peace with the Gibeonites, which was an error on his part. However, many generations later, Saul zealously wipes them out. But, instead of reward, God treats it as murder.

    Like

  5. His thought was that instead of the common theme that the Israelites went around killing all these people for their idolatry, instead, it was a matter of social justice.

    Mark! This is a little big along the lines of what we were talking about sunday…but from more of a pre solomon/post solomon perspective, with the idea that Solomon (and David) were swinging things in the ‘centralized power is good and we are enriching ourselves at your expense because god wants that’ direction. Very interesting.

    Like

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