BREAKING: Janet Mefferd Removes Tweets and Blog Material Regarding Mark Driscoll and Alleged Plagiarism

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BREAKING:  Janet Mefferd Removes Tweets and Blog Material Regarding Mark Driscoll and Alleged Plagiarism

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Ok, I just got home and something is going down with Mefferd regarding the allegations of Mark  plagiarism by Mark Driscoll in several books.  Dee of Wartburg Watch tagged me in a tweet that Mefferd removed all of her tweets and blog material related to the Driscoll/plagiarism situation.  I also received an e-mail that Mefferd was going to be saying something about this on her show today.

I found the following tweets.  The top tweet is the most recent.  As I find more information, I will update.

Screen Shot 2013-12-04 at 12.15.13 PM

My gut response is that someone is forcing her to do this and that is not sitting right with me at all.

You can follow along with the latest here:   Janet Mefferd Removes Blog Posts and Tweets Related to Mark Driscoll’s Alleged Plagiarism.  *     *     *

308 comments on “BREAKING: Janet Mefferd Removes Tweets and Blog Material Regarding Mark Driscoll and Alleged Plagiarism

  1. Mefferd gave a Driscoll / Tyndale House update on her show a few of days ago.

    Several news sources mischaracterized her earlier comments. Mefferd clarified things to say she does NOT apologize for saying Drsicoll stole material, because he did in fact steal.

    She says she only apologizes for her “tone” and “approach.”

    Mefferd still thinks Driscoll stole from other authors, and that his comments indicate he must use ghostwriters (to paraphrase her, that seemed to be what she was hinting).

    Mefferd thinks Driscoll took his sweet time getting around to publicly addressing all this stuff.

    I hope this is the right link. It was in a show she released in the last 4 or 5 days. I remember she spent the first few minutes talking about something else, then she got to the Driscoll stuff.

    Janet Mefferd Show – 12/19/2013 (Mefferd comments again on Driscoll / Tyndale Controversy

    She seems to think Tyndale and Driscoll gave lame responses to all this.

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  2. “Radical? Absolutely. Yet there is evidence that even John Calvin did not accept traditional formulations of trinitarian doctrine. I understand that he was at one point put on trial for failing to embrace trinitarian doctrine. I understand that, though his prosecutors abandoned the trial, they did so without any kind of recantation by Calvin.”

    Hannah, would love the source material on that. The irony is striking if true because he put Servetus on trial for that very thing and burned him at the stake. And yes, Cal is guilty as he was the go to authority in Geneva. There was a backlash to the burning that he lamented about later in a letter to a friend. Poor Cal. More and more people in Geneva were starting to see him as a cruel tyrant.

    He could have let Servetus go as he was just passing through and came to hear him preach. Servetus was not a citizen of Geneva. Years earlier Calvin had written in a letter to a friend if Servetus ever came to Geneva he would not leave alive. It was premeditated and involved Servetus’ writings concerning the Trinity and his refusal to accept it.

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  3. Lydia,

    Regarding Calvin’s trial for anti-trinitarianism, Stanford Rives writes:

    “In a heresy hearing of 1537 dominated by Lutherans, Calvin was himself accused of being a follower of Servetus. . . . That trial ended without Calvin having to affirm belief in a trinity or the persons formula to describe the Godhead, or having to affirm the Nicene or Athanasian Creed. The objective of Pastor Pierre Caroli in bringing the accusation of Servetus-ism was to obtain all those confessions from Calvin. However, at the end, for sake of unity of the Protestant cause, at the urging of the pastors hearing the matter, Pastor Caroli backed down and agreed to sign a pact of reconciliation with Calvin on no conditions at all.”

    Rives, Stanford (2011-11-08). Did Calvin Murder Servetus? (Kindle Locations 3143-3149). . Kindle Edition. (From Ch. 14, titled “Luther And Calvin Were Impacted Positively By Servetus”)

    In addition to the above-quoted material from Rives’ book, see Ch 32, titled “Proofs of Murder Summarized.”

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  4. Ah, Calvin. I really didn’t fully understand all of the issues with Calvin and his crimes until I got so sick and tired of VF (especially DP and GB) and ATI-types talking about Calvin and his Institutes as if he was the end all, be all and Geneva as if it was near Utopia, that I decided to do some serious first-hand study on Calvin. And it is not a pretty picture. Most Calvinist totally give this guy a pass without ever studying him closely.

    The best book — bar none — on the total picture of Calvin and Calvinism is “The Other Side of Calvinism” by Laurence M. Vance. It is a scholarly tome of 788 pages, but it is meticulously researched and end-noted and is by far the most comprehensive research I’ve come across.

    Here’s a few tidbits on Calvin from Vance’s painstaking research and it will give you a view into what DP and GB and other Theonomists would hope to create in a New Geneva setting:
    * Calvin was known as the “Genevese dictator” and his many rules left no area of life untouched
    * There were laws against: dancing, profanity, gambling, immodesty, and the number of dishes you could eat at a meal (to regulate gluttony, naturally)
    * Church attendance was mandatory and watchmen stood guard on the streets to haul you into a church
    * The Press was censored
    * Books were banned that did not align with Calvin’s approval
    * The naming of children was regulated (you got prison time if you named a child the same as a Catholic saint)
    * 20 people were burned at the stake as witches that were prosecuted by Calvin’s church court after he suspected them of causing the 1545 plague in Geneva
    * From 1542 to 1546 Calvin had another 58 people executed and 76 exiled because of disagreements with his theology
    * Torture was frequently employed by Calvin to extract confessions
    * Calvin instituted the death penalty for adultery (oops, sorry DP, I know you LOVE Calvin, and even had a huge birthday bash in his honor, but he would have had you killed for your nanny affair). Of course Calvin went a little easier on his step-daughter and sister-in-law when they were caught in adultery.
    * One prime example is that he had a hairdresser thrown in prison because he felt that the hairstyle she had done for a bride made the bride look too much like a harlot.

    Servetus was merely one example, but imagine the worst and Calvin did it. Calvin was especially hard on his critics like Servetus that merely questioned Calvin on some of his theology. Servetus came to Geneva to have a face-to-face discussion and was killed because Calvin wouldn’t allow the criticism. Many others met similar fates. Questioning anything in Calvin’s Institutes was on the same level as questioning scripture.

    Sort of like BCA under DP.

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  5. Calvin was spoken of in my old church and some quote him often on FB but I never heard of these issues about him that some of you are bringing up. This is disturbing to me that this side of him is never spoken of.

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  6. Checking into the history of denominations and confessions can be eye opening. I also have a difficult time when people hold up the Westminster Confession as a landmark document. It was written as a means to enforce the religion of choice at the time. The ruling party and the religious leaders combined to bring conformity and consolidate power religiously and governmentally. It was expected that all subjects nine years and older would confess to the WCF. If they didn’t, they might well be persecuted religiously and as subjects of England or Scotland. At some point men and women will need to come to the conclusion that you can’t force God upon mankind. Faith is a work of the Spirit in each individual. Jesus knew this well and didn’t force himself on anyone.

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  7. Gary W, Thanks for the information on the book. Looks interesting. Here is another interesting read:

    One of the challenges with reading about Calvin is so much of history was written by the Reformers…those in power which makes their evil look more normal as it was to them. Thankfully they kept pretty good records so we can see how one sided their “trials” were and no longer think burning “heretics” pleases God.

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  8. Pingback: The Evangelical Industrial Complex Admitted By Ingrid Schlueter | Ephesians 5:11 Blog

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